VictoriaCeliac.org

2017 Anti Panic Sessions

Upcoming dates for 2017

2017: September 16, October 21, November 18.

Sessions are not held in August and December.

Classes are held at Thrifty Foods, Admiral's Walk shopping centre at the Admiral's Road location and run from 10:00 am to 12:30 pm.

NOTE: Pre-registration is required.

To register, or for support or information before the next class please email glutenfree278@gmail.com

 

What are Anti Panic Sessions?

A crash course about transitioning to a gluten-free diet. The class is provided at no cost for new members of the CCA along with family members or a friend. The two hour class covers what to eat and what not to, where to shop, where to dine and generally how to live your new gluten-free life. The class orients and assures new members that they are not alone in making this huge adjustment. Led by knowledgeable local volunteers who have been through the same experience and will help you survive this transition. Contact us today to register for the upcoming session.

The Victoria suport group wishes to express sincere appreciation to Jessalyn O’Donnell,Thrifty Foods’ Registered Dietitian, who was instrumental in arranging to make the very comfortable classroom at Thrifty's available for this purpose and for Thrifty's generous ongoing support to celiacs and those with gluten sensitivity.

To view Thrifty Foods Gluten-Free Product Guide see http://www.thriftyfoods.com/EN/main/wellness/gluten-free.html

Join/Renew CCA

Join or Renew your Membership with the Canadian Celiac Association

Membership in the Canadian Celiac Association
What are the benefits of joining the Canadian Celiac Association?

New members receive

  • A New Member’s Kit containing material about celiac disease and about learning to live with the gluten-free diet.
  • A national online newsletter Celiac News.
  • Opportunity to attend the Anti Panic Sessions to help you and your family learn about the diet, where to buy gluten free food and how to cope with your new lifestyle. Click on link for information about the Anti Panic Sessions.

Other Benefits of Membership

  • Current accurate resources on celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis through CCA publications and reviews of current literature.
  • Up-to-date product information and food recalls.
  • Opportunity to contribute to research on celiac disease.
  • Discounts on CCA print materials and National Conference registration fees.
  • Access to help and information via the 1-800 number.

Your Membership helps our national organization advocate for:

  • Better food labeling (i.e., disclosure of all sources of gluten in foods).
  • Government recognition of extra costs and time involved in eating gluten-free.
  • Safety, availability and enrichment of gluten-free products.
  • Public awareness and understanding to make living gluten-free easier and safer.
  • Medical awareness to ensure early diagnosis, and optimal continuum of care.

How to Join or Renew your Membership

Click on link below to access pdf application for membership form.

http://www.celiac.ca/?page_id=2624

 

New Membership

You can pay by credit card or cheque.  Please make your cheque, in the amount of $65,  payable to Canadian Celiac Association.

The $65 membership fee applies to the first year only when you receive many additional benefits including all the help you need as a newly diagnosed celiac or a person with gluten intolerance.

Renewing your membership

Membership renewal in subsequent years is $50 per year or you can save by renewing your membership for 3 or 5 years.

Download the free Acrobat Reader® software, so you can view and print Adobe PDF files.

Membership runs for twelve months. Membership runs from the last day of the month you join until the same date the following year.

Newsletter

Current Newsletter:

Current Newsletters - a download link will be emailed out to all active members. Please ensure that you have Version 6 or above of Adobe Acrobat Reader. If yours is not uptodate, you can download Adobe Reader for free here.

Newsletter Archives:

Pocket Dictionary

Canadian Celiac Association Pocket Dictionary

2nd edition compiled by Alexandra Anca MHSc., RD Consulting Dietitian

The Pocket Dictionary is supplied free to all new members of the Canadian Celiac Association. The Pocket Dictionary interprets food and food ingredients from A to Z and tells you if they are allowed, not allowed or to be questioned on the gluten free diet. Carry this useful guide to the grocery store, the restaurant or use in the kitchen. You won’t want to be without this pocket-sized booklet.

Additional copies may be purchased for a cost of $7 for members and $10 for non-members. Email glutenfree278@gmail.com to purchase this dictionary.

Gluten Free Diet Book

Gluten Free Diet

Gluten Free Diet - A Comprehensive Resource Guide Revised and Expanded Edition by Shelley Case, Dietitian

  • Over 3100 gluten free specialty foods listed by company and product name.
  • Directory of more than 270 American, Canadian and international companies.
  • Creative ideas for meals and snacks.
  • Recipes and baking tips.

Shelley Case is a member of the CCA Professional Advisory Board.

Her book is the most useful resource you will ever buy to guide you through the complexities of the gluten free diet. It is available from our Chapter for a special price of $24 for members and $27 for non-members, no tax. For more details on the guide check the website www.glutenfreediet.ca.

Email glutenfree278@gmail.com to purchase this book.

Make a Donation

MAKE A DONATION

Donations

Only one in 53 celiacs is lucky enough to be diagnosed and then only after an average of 12 years of doctors' visits. The Canadian Celiac Association welcomes donations to provide support to those who need to live with a gluten free diet. 

If you or your business are interested in assisting the Canadian Celiac Association with our research or national programs of awareness and support we gratefully accept donations.

To make a donation please follow the links on our national website celiac.ca for detalis about how to donate and information about how your donation will be used.

You will receive a charitable tax receipt.

Your generosity is appreciated.

Contact

CONTACT INFORMATION

Canadian Celiac Association
5025 Orbitor Drive, Bldg 1, Suite 400
Mississauga, Ontario, L4W 4Y5
Tel: 905-507-6208
Toll Free: 1-800-363-7296
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Website: www.celiac.ca

 

Victoria Support Group

320 Niagara Street, Victoria BC  V8V 1G6

Email address is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

We also have three Vancouver Island Support Groups

  • Courtenay/Comox support group
  • Nanaimo support group
  • Campbell River support group

For details of how to contact these satellite groups, please contact us by email victoriaceliacs@hotmail.ca

Links to Other Chapters

Links

LOCAL STORES

Download pdf file of great places to shop for gluten free food.

Celiac-Friendly-Shopping-in-Victoria-2014.pdf

 

 

Events/Local

2017 Local Information

What’s on in Victoria

AGM

Members are cordially invited to the Canadian Celiac Association
Victoria Chapter Annual General Meeting
Sunday, September 10, 2017 at 12 noon
at the home of Kathleen Shoemaker
Address: 10 Lotus St, Victoria
This is a potluck, light lunch event! Please bring a dish to serve 6-8 people.
Kindly bring the ingredient list or recipe, whatever serving utensils are needed,
and a plate, cutlery, and mug for yourself.
Although the Victoria Chapter will be disbanded, retire its charitable number, and
be replaced by a more casual “support group” at some point in the future, for the
moment we are recommending that the chapter continue as it is until policies and
procedures are fully developed by National.
AGM Agenda
Report of the President
Report of the Treasurer
Election of Officers
Please RSVP by September 4 to Anne
at wragtyan@shaw.ca
and put “CCA AGM” in the subject line of your email.

ANTI PANIC SESSIONS are continuing in 2017

Upcoming dates for 2017

2017 sesssions are on September 16, October 21, November 18.

Sessions are not held in August and December.

Classes are held at Thrifty Foods, Admiral's Walk shopping centre at the Admiral's Road location.

Pre-registration is required.

To register, or for support or information before the next class, contact glutenfree278@gmail.com .

What are Anti Panic Sessions?

A crash course about transitioning to a gluten-free diet. The class is provided at no cost for new members of the CCA along with family members or a friend. The two hour class covers what to eat and what not to, where to shop, where to dine and generally how to live your new gluten-free life. The class orients and assures new members that they are not alone in making this huge adjustment. Led by knowledgeable local volunteers who have been through the same experience and will help you survive this transition. Contact us today to register for the upcoming session.

We wish to express sincere appreciation to Jessalyn O’Donnell,Thrifty Foods’ Registered Dietitian, who was instrumental in arranging to make the very comfortable classroom at Thrifty's available for this purpose and for Thrifty's generous ongoing support to celiacs and those with gluten sensitivity.

To view Thrifty Foods Gluten-Free Product Guide see http://www.thriftyfoods.com/EN/main/wellness/gluten-free.html

CAMPBELL RIVER AREA

Campbell River has an informal Support Group of about ten people that meets at 7:00 pm the 2nd Wednesday of each month (except July and August) in the Sunshine Wellness Centre at the Campbell River Hospital. For more information, contact either Jacki Price 250 923 3638 or Carol Nelson 250 923 4319

NANAIMO:

NORTH ISLAND/COURTENAY:

 

At our Annual General Meeting on Sunday, September 18 2016 the following motion was passed:

“That the Victoria Chapter, in the absence of an executive, proceed with proper steps to disband the chapter including early cashing of its GIC, discontinue its charitable status, and assume the role of a Support Group of the CCA.”

Medical Expense tax credit

Medical Expenses and Celiac Disease

Did you know that you can claim a medical tax credit for the cost of your gluten free food? Here’s how.

Updated for the 2014 income tax year

Medical Expenses and Celiac Disease

Since 2003 the Federal Government has allowed celiacs to claim the incremental cost of gluten-free food as a medical expense.

Claiming allowable medical expenses Who can claim?

  • Patient must have celiac disease.
  • Patient must be certified by a medical practitioner as requiring a gluten-free diet. Keep a copy of your doctor’s letter in case you need it in subsequent years.
  • Actual claim can be made by individual, spouse or parent (for minors with celiac disease) Since total medical expenses must exceed 3% of net income (or $2,208 whichever is less) it may be advantageous for the family member with the lowest income to make the claim.

What is allowed?

  • The incremental cost of gluten-free products.
  • Difference between cost of gf products and non-gf products on an item by item basis.
  • Generally limited to products specifically produced and marketed for gf diets.
  • Can claim “intermediate items”, that is baking supplies and ingredients to make gf food.
  • Only portion related to person with celiac disease. For example, if there is only one celiac in the household but everyone eats the gf bread, then only the portion eaten by the celiac can be claimed. But as we pointed out, non-celiacs don’t eat gf bread in preference to regular bread.

How to claim

  • Calculate incremental cost of gf food. This means saving all your food receipts for the year and listing easily comparable items such as 52 loaves of gf bread @ $7 per loaf. Compare this with an average price of regular bread. Then deduct the cost of regular bread from the cost of gf bread and enter the amount into the claim column. It is not unreasonable to take into account the difference in size of bread loaf, whether comparing by weight or number of slices. Do the same thing with baking items such as rice flour and compare it with wheat flour by weight. Some items such as xanthan gum do not have an equivalent and you would not have bought them at all if you were not compelled to follow the gf diet. In these cases only, claim the whole cost of the item. Apart from this one possibly reasonable exception, do not attempt to claim the full costs of gf foods. If you are caught, your return will likely be flagged for regular and repeated scrutiny.
  • Determine portion related to person with celiac disease.
  • Add to claim line for other medical expenses
  • Line 330 of Schedule 1 (Federal)
  • Line 5868 of Schedule BC428 (Provincial)
  • Total medical expenses must exceed 3% of net income (to a max of $2,208) See previous note about the lowest income earner filing on behalf of celiac family member.
  • Expenses can be claimed for any 12-month period ending in the year.
  • Receipts to be submitted if paper filing. If the bundle of receipts is ridiculously huge, try submitting just your summary sheet with a note that receipts are available on request.
  • Receipts must be retained if filing electronically. You may be required to produce your receipt evidence at any time even after receiving your Notice of Assessment. When returns are electronically filed, only the medical tax credit total is transmitted. The fact that you are a celiac claiming for the incremental cost of gf food as part of your medical tax expenses will not be apparent. A big jump in your medical tax claim could trigger a review. For example if you have never made a medical tax claim before and suddenly you are claiming $3,000 the CRA may want to know why.

What is it worth?

  • 15% Federal credit of allowable expenses
  • 5.06% BC credit equal to lowest marginal income tax rate
  • $1,000 of allowable expenses saves tax of $200.60
  • Examples:
  • $30,000 net income, $1,500 medical expenses saves $120
  • $50,000 net income, $1,500 medical expenses saves $0

To access the CRA web site click http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs/ncm-tx/rtrn/cmpltng/ddctns/lns300-350/330/clc-eng.html

Information provided by Victoria Chartered Accountant Anthony Lobmeier.

Concerns about GF status

Celiac Concerns

If you believe a food or product presents a health and safety risk or have a concern about labelling, call toll free at 1.800.442.2342 and you will be directed to the appropriate department.
For the Vancouver Island office:

Reception Desk
Vancouver Island,  BC Coastal Region
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
103 - 4475 Viewmont Avenue, Victoria, BC V8Z 6L8
Telephone (250) 363-3455
Facsimile (250) 363-0336
Government of Canada
www.inspection.gc.ca

For the National Headquarters office:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
1400 Merivale Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0Y9
1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-225-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735
08:00 to 20:00 Eastern time, Monday to Friday

www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/contact-us/eng/1299860523723/1299860643049

Would you like to be notified of food recalls and allergy alerts by email? The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) offers an automatic notification service for food recalls and allergy alerts. To sign up, go to www.inspection.gc.ca, click on English then click on E-mail Notification Services in the Quick Link list on the right side of the window. You can choose to be notified about a specific allergy or choose All Allergies.

Gluten Sensitivity

WHAT IS NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY?

What is non-celiac gluten sensitivity?

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity has been coined to describe those individuals who cannot tolerate gluten and experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease but yet who lack the same antibodies and intestinal damage as seen in celiac disease. Early research suggests that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an innate immune response, as opposed to an adaptive immune response (such as autoimmune) or allergic reaction.

OK, so what is an innate immune response?

Humans are born with an innate immune system. An innate immune response is not antigen specific, meaning that it is nonspecific as to the type of organism it fights. Although its response is immediate against invading organisms,  the innate immune system does not have an immunological memory to invading organisms. Its response is not directed towards self tissue, which would result in autoimmune disease.

Unlike non-celiac gluten sensitivity, celiac disease is antigen specific (including tissue-transglutaminase, endomysium and deamidated gliadin antibodies, and in some small children also gliadin antibodies) and does result in an attack on its own tissue. Intestinal damage, or enteropathy, is the direct result.

What are the symptoms of non-celiac gluten sensitivity?

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity shares many symptoms with celiac disease. However, according to a collaborative report published by Sapone et al. (2012),  individuals with non-celiac gluten sensitivity have a prevalence of extraintestinal or non-GI symptoms, such as headache, “foggy mind,” joint pain, and numbness in the legs, arms or fingers. Symptoms typically appear hours or days after gluten has been ingested, a response typical for innate immune conditions like non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

If the symptoms are so similar, how is it different from celiac disease?

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity has been clinically recognized as less severe than celiac disease. It is not accompanied by “the enteropathy, elevations in tissue-transglutaminase, endomysium or deamidated gliadin antibodies, and increased mucosal permeability that are characteristic of celiac disease” (Ludvigsson et al, 2012). In other words, individuals with non-celiac gluten sensitivity would not test positive for celiac disease based on blood testing, nor do they have the same type of intestinal damage found in individuals with celiac disease. Some individuals may experience minimal intestinal damage, and this goes away with a gluten-free diet.

Research has also shown that non-celiac gluten sensitivity does not result in the increased intestinal permeability that is characteristic of celiac disease. Increased intestinal permeability permits toxins, bacteria and undigested food proteins to seep through the GI barrier and into the bloodstream, and research suggests that it is an early biological change that comes before  the onset of several autoimmune diseases.

Is non-celiac gluten sensitivity different from a wheat allergy?

Yes. Allergies, including those to wheat, are associated with positive IgE assays. Diagnosis is made through skin prick tests, wheat-specific IgE blood testing and a food challenge. Individuals who have gluten-related symptoms but test negative for a wheat allergy may have non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

Related Content:

For more information about these conditions, please visit www.CeliacCentral.org/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity.

Printed with very kind permission from Cheryl McEvoy and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness, www.CeliacCentral.org.

Newly Diagnosed

Membership in the Canadian Celiac Association

What are the benefits of joining the Canadian Celiac Association?

New members receive

  • A New Member’s Kit containing material about celiac disease and about learning to live with the gluten-free diet.
  • A national monthly newsletter Celiac News.
  • Opportunity to attend the Anti Panic Sessions to help you and your family learn about the diet, where to buy gluten free food and how to cope with your new lifestyle. Click on link for information about the Anti Panic Sessions.

Other Benefits of Membership

  • Current accurate resources on celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis through CCA publications and reviews of current literature.
  • Up-to-date product information and food recalls.
  • Opportunity to contribute to research on celiac disease.
  • Chapter meetings that provide information, fellowship and support.
  • Discounts on CCA print materials and National Conference registration fees.
  • Access to help and information via the 1-800 number.

Your Membership helps our national organization advocate for:

  • Better food labeling (i.e., disclosure of all sources of gluten in foods).
  • Government recognition of extra costs and time involved in eating gluten-free.
  • Safety, availability and enrichment of gluten-free products.
  • Public awareness and understanding to make living gluten-free easier and safer.
  • Medical awareness to ensure early diagnosis, and optimal continuum of care.

How to Join

Click on link below to access pdf application for membership form.

http://www.celiac.ca/?page_id=2624

 

The $65 membership fee applies to the first year only when you receive many additional benefits including all the help you need as a newly diagnosed celiac or a person with gluten intolerance. Membership renewal in subsequent years is $50 per year.Download the free Acrobat Reader® software, so you can view and print Adobe PDF files.

Membership runs for twelve months. Membership runs from the last day of the month you join until the same date the following year.

Celiac Disease

What is Celiac Disease?

Celiac disease (CD) is an auto-immune disease and a permanent intolerance to gluten, a protein found in various wheats (e.g., durum, kamut, spelt), rye, barley and triticale. Gluten consumption causes damage to the absorptive surface of the small intestine and can result in malnutrition, anemia, nutritional deficiencies and an increased risk of other diseases including osteoporosis, specific cancers of the gut and other autoimmune diseases. Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is celiac disease of the skin, and is characterized by blistering, intensely itchy skin. The rash has a symmetrical distribution and is most frequently found on elbows, knees, buttocks, back of the neck, scalp and upper back. People with dermatitis herpetiformis can have gastrointestinal damage without obvious symptoms.

Genetics

Celiac disease is an inherited condition. First degree relatives (parents, brothers, sisters and children) of individuals with celiac disease are at highest risk of having unrecognized celiac disease (5-15%). It can appear at any time in the life of a person with a hereditary predisposition to it. Environmental factors such as emotional stress, pregnancy, surgery, or an infection (e.g., travellers diarrhea, pneumonia) can sometimes trigger the onset of symptoms.

Prevalence

Recent research has revealed that celiac disease affects 1:100-200 people in the United States (1,2). Growing awareness of celiac disease, earlier diagnosis and improved blood screening point to the likelihood of similar prevalence figures in Canada.

Symptoms

The number and severity of symptoms associated with untreated celiac disease can vary greatly from person to person. In some cases, undiagnosed adults with celiac disease have only iron deficiency anemia without digestive or intestinal symptoms. The similarity of the symptoms of celiac disease with those of other conditions often leads to a misdiagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, chronic fatigue syndrome or diverticulosis, thus delaying the diagnosis of celiac disease. The presence of obesity does not exclude the diagnosis of celiac disease. The following symptoms may occur individually or in combination among children or adults.

  • anemia - iron, folate or B12 deficiency
  • mouth ulcers/canker sores
  • extreme weakness and fatigue
  • weight loss
  • deficiency of vitamins A, D, E, K
  • easy bruising
  • recurring/persistent diarrhea
  • bone/joint pain
  • constipation
  • swelling of ankles and hands
  • abdominal bloating, pain, cramping or gas
  • lactose intolerance
  • indigestion and nausea
  • depression
  • menstrual irregularities
  • migraine
  • infertility/miscarriages

Additional Symptoms in children

  • delayed growth
  • delayed puberty
  • irritability and behavioural changes
  • dental enamel abnormalities
  • vomiting

Associated conditions

Celiac disease often occurs with other diseases. If you have any of the following conditions, consider having your blood tested for celiac disease.

  • family history of celiac disease
  • osteoporosis
  • type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • lymphoma
  • autoimmune thyroid disease
  • Down syndrome, Turner syndrome
  • unexplained liver enzyme elevations
  • autoimmune hepatitis
  • infertility

Diagnosis

Recent Canadian and US studies report significant delays in diagnosis (3,4). Excellent blood tests to detect endomysial (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies are now available to screen for celiac disease in people with mild or atypical symptoms and those in high risk groups. Such tests may suggest that a person has celiac disease, but they do not replace the need for an intestinal biopsy. Small intestinal biopsies are the ONLY definitive means of diagnosing celiac disease. A GLUTEN-FREE DIET SHOULD NOT BE STARTED BEFORE THE BLOOD TESTS AND BIOPSIES ARE DONE, since it can interfere with making an accurate diagnosis.

Treatment

THE ONLY TREATMENT FOR CELIAC DISEASE IS A STRICT GLUTEN-FREE DIET FOR LIFE. A strict gluten-free diet will enable recovery of the gut, and may reduce the risk of developing other associated diseases and complications. Because of the complexity of the gluten-free diet, patients should be referred to a registered dietitian with expertise in celiac disease for nutrition assessment, education and follow-up. Regular follow-up with your physician is also recommended. All persons with celiac disease are encouraged to join the Canadian Celiac Association and their local chapter for valuable practical information and ongoing support. The safety of oats in celiac disease is controversial. Over the last few years some clinical studies have shown that small amounts of un-contaminated oats may be safe for some adults and children with celiac disease. The availability of pure oats remains a problem since most commercially available oats are contaminated with gluten. Individuals must ensure that the oats they are buying are free from gluten contamination. Go to the CCA website for our position statement on oats. http://www.celiac.ca.

Bibliography

  • NIH consensus document web link: http://consensus.nih.gov/cons/118/118cdc_intro.htm
  • Fasano A, Berti I, Gerarduzzi T, et al. Prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the United States. Arch Intern Med 2003; 163:286-292.
  • Cranney A, Zarkadas M, Graham ID, Switzer C. Canadian Health Survey - Ottawa Pilot. Biomed Central 2003;3:8.
  • Green PHA, Stavropoulos SN, Panagi SG, et al. Characteristics of adult celiac disease in the USA: results of a national survey. Am J Gastroenterol 2001;96:126-131.

This page is provided by kind permission of the Calgary Chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association

Home

About The Canadian Celiac Association

Mission Statement

The Canadian Celiac Association is the national voice for people who are adversely affected by gluten, and is dedicated to improving diagnosis and quality of life.


Vision Statement

The Gluten Problem, Found, Treated, Cured.

Victoria Support Group -- helping people for 30 years

We are one of twenty-eight affiliated groups comprising the Canadian Celiac Association. The Victoria Support Group first started in 1984 and covers Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands. There are two other support groups on Vancouver Island, one in Nanaimo and one in Comox.

The address for the Victoria Chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association is:

320 Niagara Street
Victoria BC V8V 1G6

To view other celiac chapters across Canada, click here.

Need more information?

If you are visiting this site for the first time check out our information about celiac disease, gluten intolerance and The Canadian Celiac Association on this website or look at the Links page for more websites about travel, gluten free recipes, free newsletters or scientific research updates.

Anti Panic Sessions - for the Newly Diagnosed

Click here for more details.

Who should be on a Gluten Free Diet?

If you are confused about who should be on the gluten free diet, follow this link and read an Allergic Living Magazine article by celiac expert Shelley Case, B. Sc., RD. Who should be on a gluten-free diet.

Article reprinted with very kind permission from Allergic Living Magazine allergicliving.com and Shelley Case, B.Sc., RD

Shelley Case, B. Sc., RD
Case Nutrition Consulting Inc., www.glutenfreediet.ca
Author: Gluten Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide
Medical Advisory Board: Celiac Disease Foundation, Gluten Intolerance Group, Canadian Celiac Association
EMail: scase@accesscomm.ca
www.linkedin.com/in/shelleycase
www.twitter.com/#!/shelleycase
www.facebook.com/shelley.case.rd
www.facebook.com/gluten.free.diet.resource.guide
 

Why test for Celiac before going Gluten Free?

Click here to find out why you should consider the benefits of testing before going gluten free.

 

FINDING GLUTEN FREE FOOD

Gluten Free Certification program -- how will it help you find trusted sources of gluten free food?

Over 7 million Canadians looking for gluten-free products are confused and overwhelmed by the number of gluten-free label claims in the market.  They are looking for a trusted mark which guarantees food, drugs and pharmaceuticals are safe to purchase.


The CCA has spent several years developing a voluntary certification program based on a preventative approach for managing the production of gluten-free products.  Through stakeholder collaboration with major health agencies, industry associations, retailers and government, the CCA is committed to developing activities/initiatives to add value for participating manufacturers, retailers, food service and farmers.  This process will enable the CCA to sustain and expand the program moving forward.

The CCA developed the GFCP with the objective to:

  • Help Canadian consumers to make clear and informed safe food choices
  • Increase ease of access to identified gluten-free foods
  • Broaden the scope of available gluten-free products
  • Be trusted by medical doctors and other medical practitioners
  • Be the TRUSTED MARK for consumers seeking gluten-free products in Canada

For more information about the Gluten Free Certification program click on GFCP

Federal Allergen and Gluten Labelling Law

Health Canada has amended the Regulations to enhance labelling requirements for specific priority allergens, gluten sources and added sulfites in pre-packaged foods sold in Canada.

What Do the Labelling Laws Really Mean?

The labelling laws combined with recent implementation guidance documents from Health Canada (HC) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) have finally resolved the question about what the words “gluten-free” mean when found on package labels in Canada.

  • Three ppm is the minimum level of detection 
  • Five ppm the minimum level that can be measured 
  • Ten ppm is a figure adopted by some certification programs
  • Twenty parts per million is now the upper limit for gluten in products that make a claim to be ‘gluten-free.’ It is the limit identified by most medical professionals as safe for people with celiac disease.

Incidental gluten in quantities between 3 and 20 ppm in products labelled as ‘gluten-free’  will be investigated by the CFIA to determine whether Good Manufacturing/Importing Practices (GMP/GIP) are  in place to minimize or prevent cross contamination with gluten. These products will NOT be subject to recall or re-labelling.

Gluten-containing ingredients must be clearly identified on a product’s ‘ingredient list’ or in a ‘Contains warning.’ Such products can NOT be labelled ‘gluten-free.’

Cereal-based ingredients such as glucose syrup and maltodextrin,  made from wheat, can only be included in products labelled as ’gluten-free’ if processed so that gluten test results of <20 ppm can be achieved.

In summary, the labelling laws and guidance documents define what the term ‘gluten-free’ means to consumers and manufacturers / importers alike.  It also identifies the quantitative thresholds that require further investigation by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency as well as clearly identifying the ingredients that products labelled as ‘gluten-free’ cannot contain.

*Look for the Canadian Celiac Association’s comprehensive interpretation on their website celiac.ca

Click on link for more details of this landmark step forward for celiacs and those who are looking for gluten free food. 

THE CELIAC SCENE™ Guides for the Gluten Free

LOOKING FOR A RESTAURANT OR LOCAL GF FOOD EVENTS?

INTERESTED IN AN INFORMATIVE NEWSLETTER AND SHOPPING UPDATES?

Log on to THE CELIAC SCENE™ for lots of local information.


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